Paul Vorstadt has served the Toronto area as a financial expert for more than two decades. Paul Vorstadt serves National Bank Financial  as a discretionary portfolio manager.

Discretionary portfolio managers are financial investors who oversee the daily activities necessary for strategic investment. Because they can make buy and sell decisions without consulting their clients on each individual investment, they enjoy a great deal of freedom and flexibility, though they are still bound by their clients’ predetermined investment guidelines.

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Unlike stockbrokers, who only act on direct orders from the client, discretionary portfolio managers can make real-time decisions should an appropriate opportunity present itself. For example, they can assist individuals who have suddenly come into a large amount of capital that they wish to invest over a long period of time rather than deposit into an ordinary savings account.

© NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL. All rights reserved 2013 – 2017.
National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada. The National Bank of Canada is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA: TSX).

Products and services of the National Bank Financial — Wealth Management are only offered in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered for sale. All products and services are subject to the terms of the applicable agreement. The information in this Website is subject to change without notice. This communication does not constitute an offer or solicitation by anyone in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation. Prospective investors who are not resident in Canada should consult with their financial adviser to determine if these securities may lawfully be sold in their jurisdiction.

 

With 2014 officially underway it is time to review your financial plan. Most financial plans break down for 2 reasons. Firstly, for incorrect or outdated data and secondly because they are filed away in a drawer somewhere never to be seen again until it’s too late. Both problems can be solved with an annual update of your financial plan.

Now that you are one year closer to your financial goals, are you ahead or behind your plan? If so what changes if any should you make? Did you save less or more than you were supposed to? Did your income or liquidity needs change? Have your objectives changed? Did the government change any of the rules i.e. tax or pension system? In regards to your investments; what worked what didn’t work? What should you do more of, what should you do less of?

If you don’t have a financial plan, now is a good time to make one. Estimates are only 20% of Canadians have a financial plan. 1 “A good plan is like a road map: it shows the final destination and usually the best way to get there.” H. Stanley Judd.

 Planning makes optimum utilization of all available resources. It helps to reduce wastage of important resources i.e. your cash. It aims to give the highest returns with the least amount of risk at the lowest possible cost. Planning thus increases the overall likelihood of achieving your financial objectives.

 There are many risks to obtaining your optimum financial health. “Always plan ahead. It wasn’t raining when Noah built the ark.” Richard Cushing. Planning helps to forecast these risks and take the necessary precautions to avoid these risks. The two biggest risks to most people’s financial well-being are health and inflation.

Through an efficient comprehensive plan, the short-term, medium-term and long-term plans can be coordinated with each other. Such a plan allows you to exert control over your future and the confidence to make the best available decisions. Being in control allows you to track results, deviations found out and corrected. Therefore, planning becomes important to maintaining control, which results in less stress and allows you to sleep better at night.

As advisors it is our responsibility to keep clients on track with their financial objectives by having these meetings yearly, but not just with the client but with their other key professionals (accountants, lawyers etc.).

 Where most people get confused is that they believe their investments are their financial plan. In reality the investments are only part of a comprehensive financial plan. Further to that most people really don’t have a detailed investment strategy. The first part of a financial plan is key because that is what will dictate the investment strategy.

The first part closely resembles that of a business plan. A good financial plan should include:

  • Goals and Objectives
  • Time Frames
  • Balance Sheet
  • Income and Cash Flow Statement
  • Risk Identification
  • Strategies/Action Plan
  • Projections
  • Stress Test

 Once we have the goals, time frame, income and liquidity requirements, and target rate of return we have the framework for what we need to accomplish through our investments. In order to give yourself the best opportunity to achieve these investment results you need a plan. Too many investors have no strategy at all — they merely react to each twitch of the market on the fly. If you fail to plan, goes the saying, then you plan to fail. If you do not have a portfolio built on a plan (for example: diversified, split among stocks, bonds, cash and so forth), then it is time to build one. Within your investment plan is the strategy you are going to use, from the asset allocation to when you are going to buy and sell. It is the lack of a plan that allows us to be drawn to the noise and make decisions based on emotions.

Emotion is the enemy of investors, and that’s why you must have a methodology that relies on objective data points, and not just gut instinct. When we make investment decisions based on emotion we fall victim to our natural response to stress which is fear and panic or the other side of that coin, greed. Successful investing requires an objectivity void of all emotion.

The biggest obstacle to a successful financial plan is the absence of constant update and review. As the situations in life change, your financial plan requires regular reviewing and updating. Just as how you undergo regular health checkups to review your health and regular service for your vehicle, your financial plan also needs regular examination.

Paul Vorstadt, Portfolio Manager and Vice President

Brett Kowan, Portfolio Manager

Dundee Goodman Private Wealth

  1. “It’s Time to Get Over ‘Getting By’ ” Financial Planning Standards Council Cary List, President & CEO, FPSC November 17, 2013, http://financialplanningweek.ca/news/its-time-get-over-getting
© NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL. All rights reserved 2013 – 2017.
National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada. The National Bank of Canada is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA: TSX).
Products and services of the National Bank Financial — Wealth Management are only offered in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered for sale. All products and services are subject to the terms of the applicable agreement. The information in this Website is subject to change without notice. This communication does not constitute an offer or solicitation by anyone in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation. Prospective investors who are not resident in Canada should consult with their financial adviser to determine if these securities may lawfully be sold in their jurisdiction.

Paul Vorstadt serves as a portfolio manager at National Bank Financial. In his role as a portfolio manager, Paul Vorstadt leverages years of experience helping clients to make sound investment decisions.

What does a portfolio manager do?

The portfolio manager, or PM, is the person with the most authority in client communications. The PM not only manages clients’ investments, but may also advise clients about when, where, and with whom to invest. The PM becomes intimately familiar with clients’ investment histories, current accounts, and plans for the future, and often has authority to make investment decisions for the client.

What is the role of an investment advisor?

An investment advisor, or IA, essentially helps clients make the wisest choice with their money. Whether clients are investing for retirement, savings, or general protection, IAs help make the investment process less complex and guide clients on how to achieve their financial goals.

© NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL. All rights reserved 2013 – 2017.
National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada. The National Bank of Canada is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA: TSX).

Products and services of the National Bank Financial — Wealth Management are only offered in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered for sale. All products and services are subject to the terms of the applicable agreement. The information in this Website is subject to change without notice. This communication does not constitute an offer or solicitation by anyone in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation. Prospective investors who are not resident in Canada should consult with their financial adviser to determine if these securities may lawfully be sold in their jurisdiction.

As a portfolio manager for National Bank Financial, Paul Vorstadt offers clients a wide range of services, including estate planning, general portfolio management, and wealth management. In his spare time, Paul Vorstadt enjoys playing hockey and golf, and he has served as co-chair of the golf tournament for St. John’s Rehab in Toronto.

Here are a few tips on how golfers can improve their driving distance:

Assume the proper stance—When golfers address the ball, both the shoulder and left foot should be facing in the direction of the target. The left foot should also be positioned directly beneath the left shoulder at a 45-degree angle.

Don’t swing too hard—As golfers bring their clubs back to begin the backswing, they should remember not to swing too hard at first. The movement should be performed at a normal pace, as rushing the backswing can interrupt one’s timing, which in turn can hinder a golfer’s ability to hit the ball farther.

Don’t grip the club too tightly—When attempting to add distance, one’s grip on the club should be firm but not too firm. If judging on a scale from one to 10, the grip should not exceed a five.

© NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL. All rights reserved 2013 – 2017.
National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada. The National Bank of Canada is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA: TSX).

Products and services of the National Bank Financial — Wealth Management are only offered in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered for sale. All products and services are subject to the terms of the applicable agreement. The information in this Website is subject to change without notice. This communication does not constitute an offer or solicitation by anyone in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation. Prospective investors who are not resident in Canada should consult with their financial adviser to determine if these securities may lawfully be sold in their jurisdiction.

Paul Vorstadt works at National Bank Financial, as portfolio manager and vice president. He has served financial clients since 1994, offering a wide range of services to best suit their needs. Paul Vorstadt provides expert portfolio management in order to prepare his customers for the future.

Portfolio management refers to arranging investments in order to reach certain goals. There are a number of different approaches, and each suits some better than others. Passive management is an approach that was popular during the 1990s. These types of funds are the choice of investors who are comfortable with market-level rates of return. Strategic asset allocation is a passive management approach where the portfolio is fixed, and a typical blend of investments might include 10 percent cash, 30 percent bonds, and 60 percent equities.

Active management is where a portfolio manager allocates a client’s assets by way of certain strategies. In tactical asset allocation, the mix can be altered to react to changing financial conditions. This enables an investment professional to manage risk continuously by balancing the client’s investment portfolio.

 

© NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL. All rights reserved 2013 – 2017.
National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada. The National Bank of Canada is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA: TSX).

Products and services of the National Bank Financial — Wealth Management are only offered in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered for sale. All products and services are subject to the terms of the applicable agreement. The information in this Website is subject to change without notice. This communication does not constitute an offer or solicitation by anyone in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation. Prospective investors who are not resident in Canada should consult with their financial adviser to determine if these securities may lawfully be sold in their jurisdiction.

As a professional in financial services, Paul Vorstadt currently works with National Bank Financial. He brings nearly two decades of experience developing solid strategies to assist clients with all aspects of financial planning. Paul Vorstadt’s specialties include areas of finance such as risk management, wealth management, and finance management during divorce. In addition, he offers assistance to clients in the form of general portfolio management.

Portfolio management covers multiple aspects of finance, most commonly involving investments. Individuals who assist clients with portfolio management may advise them regarding the correlation of investments to objectives or goals, in addition to evaluating risk in relation to the performance of a corporation or institution.

Undergoing general or project portfolio management provides several benefits to a corporation or other business. Considering that portfolio management helps business leaders and other executives visualize available funding, it may help to provide more accurate estimates for project budgets. This may result in an overall reduction in the occurrence of overspending.

The streamlined organization of project funding may also help to make overall project plans more efficient and result in more success for each project. This is due to a decrease in factors such as schedule delays and poorly managed resources.

© NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL. All rights reserved 2013 – 2017.
National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada. The National Bank of Canada is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA: TSX).

Products and services of the National Bank Financial — Wealth Management are only offered in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered for sale. All products and services are subject to the terms of the applicable agreement. The information in this Website is subject to change without notice. This communication does not constitute an offer or solicitation by anyone in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation. Prospective investors who are not resident in Canada should consult with their financial adviser to determine if these securities may lawfully be sold in their jurisdiction.

Paul Vorstadt is a financial professional based in Toronto, Canada. As graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University with a B.A. in economics, Paul Vorstadt is a Certified Financial Planner and Fellow of the Canadian Securities Institute. As such, Mr. Vorstadt knows that a strong understanding of the price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio helps investors make sound financial decisions.

The P/E ratio is calculated by dividing the current market value of a stock by earnings per share for the previous year. For example, if the current market price of a stock was $43 per share, and earnings per share for the previous year was $1.95, the P/E ratio would be 22.05.

The general rule of thumb is, a higher P/E ratio means higher earnings growth is expected over competitors with a lower P/E ratio. The ratio does not tell the entire story, however. The P/E ratio is a relative metric. In order for it to have any meaning, it must be compared against industry or market averages. Once the P/E ratio of an industry is understood, it can then be used in the identification of attractive investment opportunities.

© NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL. All rights reserved 2013 – 2017.
National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada. The National Bank of Canada is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA: TSX).

Products and services of the National Bank Financial — Wealth Management are only offered in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered for sale. All products and services are subject to the terms of the applicable agreement. The information in this Website is subject to change without notice. This communication does not constitute an offer or solicitation by anyone in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation. Prospective investors who are not resident in Canada should consult with their financial adviser to determine if these securities may lawfully be sold in their jurisdiction.

When Paul Vorstadt joined National Bank Financial in 2016, he had about 21 years of experience in the financial services industry, more than half of which was spent as a vice president at TD Waterhouse in Markham, Ontario. When not attending to his professional responsibilities, Paul Vorstadt actively participates in community activities, co-chairing the St. John’s Rehab Foundation Golf Classic and coaching for the Whitby Minor Hockey Association (WMHA).

Minor ice hockey in Canada, not to be confused with minor league professional hockey, refers to organized amateur youth ice hockey governed by Hockey Canada. The WMHA traces its roots to the early years of the 20th century and has belonged to the provincial body, the Ontario Minor Hockey Association, for more than 75 years.

For the 2013 – 14 season, approximately 2,550 boys and girls will play for about 158 house league teams, and another 600 or so will play for WMHA’s 35 representative teams. The house league is organized into teams by age, and those compete against each other; the representative teams, also organized by age, compete against teams from other hockey associations, often traveling to other cities for their matches. Only residents of Whitby may play on SMHA teams.

Many current and former National Hockey League players played minor hockey with WMHA, including Wayne and Keith Primeau, Paul Ranger, Jamie Allison, Peter Vipond, Brad Dalgamo, and Mike Keenan.

© NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL. All rights reserved 2013 – 2017.
National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada. The National Bank of Canada is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA: TSX).

Products and services of the National Bank Financial — Wealth Management are only offered in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered for sale. All products and services are subject to the terms of the applicable agreement. The information in this Website is subject to change without notice. This communication does not constitute an offer or solicitation by anyone in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation. Prospective investors who are not resident in Canada should consult with their financial adviser to determine if these securities may lawfully be sold in their jurisdiction.

Paul Vorstadt has served as a portfolio manager at National Bank Financial, Canada, since 2016. Offering 21 years of expertise in the financial services industry, Paul Vorstadt has earned CFP, CIM, and FCSI designations to offer clients the widest possible range of investments, and has recently earned the Certified Divorce Financial Analyst designation.

A Certified Divorce Financial Analyst (CDFA) is a professional certification for financial planners and advisors who help clients develop financial plans in the event of divorce. Established by the IDFA (Institute for Divorce Financial Analysts) in 1993, the CDFA certification is granted after completion of self-study coursework in three or four modules, depending on the country of origin.

Candidates pursuing a CDFA certificate must prove a minimum of three years’ experience in the financial services, accounting, or family law fields; complete the program within one year; achieve 70% or higher scores on all IDFA certification tests; and complete 15 hours of continuing education every two years.

The particulars contained herein were obtained from sources which we believe are reliable, but are not guaranteed by us and may be incomplete. The opinions expressed have not been approved by and are not those of Dundee Goodman Private Wealth, its subsidiaries, or its affiliates, including, but not limited to, Dundee Securities Ltd., including its divisions, Dundee Goodman Private Wealth, Dundee Capital Markets, Dundee Goodman Insurance Agency Ltd., Dundee Securities Europe LLP, and Dundee Securities Inc. This website is not deemed to be used as a solicitation in a jurisdiction where this Dundee representative is not registered.

© NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL. All rights reserved 2013 – 2017.
National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada. The National Bank of Canada is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA: TSX).

Products and services of the National Bank Financial — Wealth Management are only offered in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered for sale. All products and services are subject to the terms of the applicable agreement. The information in this Website is subject to change without notice. This communication does not constitute an offer or solicitation by anyone in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation. Prospective investors who are not resident in Canada should consult with their financial adviser to determine if these securities may lawfully be sold in their jurisdiction.

For many couples, a divorce may be the most trying period of their lives. Not only must they deal with emotional repercussions, but they must also perform the monumental task of dividing a shared life.

Often, this takes a much greater financial toll on families than anticipated. Shared assets and shared debts must be dealt with fairly. Couples used to having combined incomes, or stay-at-home spouses who are not accustomed to working, must face an entirely new financial reality. This is where a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst, or CDFA, can help. CDFAs are deeply familiar with the financial pitfalls of divorce. They can help explain often-confusing choices and help clients to traverse the difficulties ahead.

By giving clients a clearer view of their options in the divorce process, CDFAs can help people save money. They can also help to predict the long-term implications of the divorce settlement, including tax benefits and liabilities, current financial requirements, and even retirement needs. Finally, they can address immediate needs, helping to create realistic new household budgets.

About Paul Vorstadt: A Certified Divorce Financial Analyst and a financial planner, Paul Vorstadt possesses experience in divorce settlement, wealth preservation, portfolio-building, and retirement income planning.

© NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL. All rights reserved 2013 – 2017.
National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada. The National Bank of Canada is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA: TSX).

Products and services of the National Bank Financial — Wealth Management are only offered in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered for sale. All products and services are subject to the terms of the applicable agreement. The information in this Website is subject to change without notice. This communication does not constitute an offer or solicitation by anyone in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation. Prospective investors who are not resident in Canada should consult with their financial adviser to determine if these securities may lawfully be sold in their jurisdiction.

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